It’s 1946 and after Langston’s mother dies, his father feels that Alabama has nothing left for him and moves himself and his son to Chicago where he believes they can avoid the severe discrimination of the South.  A sensitive boy who was very close to his mother and has spent very little time with his father, Langston especially misses his grandmother and her cooking. He is teased and bullied at school but finds solace at the public library he stumbles upon by chance.  Unlike those in Alabama, the library in Chicago welcomes African-Americans. A friendly librarian helps him find great books, including books of poetry by Langston Hughes whom she assumes he was named for. As the school bullying intensifies and tragedy hits his family, Langston finds that this poetry and the kindness of a neighbor may be key to helping him find his place in this new home.  This Coretta Scott King Honor title is historical fiction at its best.